Queen Board Game Could Inspire Other Bands For Create A Similar Products

The most famous board game in the world has been in the news recently, though for two completely different reasons. The first occasion regarded the announcement that the company had decided to change some of the game pieces.

In the new edition the set will be sold without the boot, wheelbarrow, and thimble, three of the traditional game pieces. In their place will be a penguin, a rubber ducky, and a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

A few days later, the game made news in the music world. The band who once was deemed as more popular than The Beatles, Queen, has created a similar board game base on their career.

The design traces the different stages of Queen’s history, starting from their formation in the late sixties through the death of front man Freddie Mercury in 1996. The game pieces also reflect the band’s career, starting with a hammer that represents the single “Hammer To Fall” from the album called The Works. Other pieces include Brian May’s unique guitar, the robot from the cover of the News of the World album, a vacuum cleaner that recalls the classic video for “I Want To Break Free” and a bicycle that signifies the smash hit “Bicycle Race” from the Jazz album.

Following the lead set by the group that gave us “Bohemian Rhapsody” along with numerous enduring hits, other bands might decide to create a similar board game reflecting their careers. These items would very likely become prized possessions for millions of nostalgic fans.

Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey, the surviving members of The Who, could oversee a board game based on their history. The squares could include a “Detour” to mark the original name of the group, as well as take participants through highlights such as the rock opera Tommy, the epic Quadrophenia, the classic Who’s Next album, and finally their induction into the Rock Hall of Fame.

Like the Queen set, the Who game might have pieces associated with their notable hits. A squeeze box could represent that Top Ten single from Who By Numbers, and a miniature bus might replicate their sixties anthem “Magic Bus.” Other pieces ought to include a pinball machine for “Pinball Wizard” from Tommy, a “Bell Boy” for the fan favorite from Quadrophenia, and a spider for bassist John Entwistle’s song about the arachnid named Boris.

Most bands with a storied history as long as that of the Who could create a game similar to the one Queen will make available in May. It would not only be an interesting project, but very likely lead to a revived appreciation for their music.